Tag Archives: Marcel Deiss

Bentleigh Tasting Group – Alsace Whites

The group met recently after a brief hiatus to look at a pretty diverse topic. Alsace is a French region very close to my heart having visited twice. It is possibly the most underrated and also misunderstood, which is partly to do with the seemingly unfocused nature (no one key variety or style) and the fact that it has a complicated history (several times it has been part of Germany). In my opinion it is the most beautiful wine region, and the people are some of the warmest in the country, possibly due to their history of oppression and war.

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Marcel Deiss – 24/02/2012

Langenberg 1er Cru 2009
Flinty and bright minerality, was full and bold in fruit and was quite rich whilst being pure and restrained.

Schoffweg 1er Cru 2008
A soy mirin and oyster sauce nose with very shy fruit, and was much more subtle in the minerality and savoury elements on the palate.

Gruenspiel 1er Cru 2007
Somewhat an oddity as it contains some red pinot noir in it. Some red and white berry aromas and was very soft but slightly astringent

Gruenspiel 1er Cru 2004
Showing the influence of age on the colour of the wine (orange onion colour) and on the palate, picking up some savoury mushroom and berries and nuts.

Mambourg 2009
A creamy vanilla aroma derived from barrel work and malolactic fermentation, with a bold and earthy mid-palate structure.

Schoenenbourg Grand Cru 2008
A lovely pure mineralic stone fruit nose with rich sweet texture and balance.

Altenbourg Grand Cru 2008
Much bolder and more powerful with some nut and mushroom complexity. Both wines were exceptionally well balanced, fresh and elegant and will live for a long time in the bottle.

Marcel Deiss Altenbourg

Marcel Deiss Altenbourg

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Difference of opinion (Alsace, France – Day Four)

One of the major goals of my journey is to discover first hand what makes each great region in the wine world unique, to find a consistency if there is one. With so many regions to choose from as a wine consumer, it helps to have some element of the product to distinguish it from everything else. Most major regions in Europe usually have more producers than all of Australia, and when you only visit six of them it isn’t always easy to get an accurate snapshot. If you are visiting very high quality ones it does help, as the tenets of quality are usually the same (low yields, natural yeast fermentation etc.) Even in these circumstances you can get producers that have almost completely different philosophies, yet both produce outstanding wines. This is one of the many things that makes wine such an amazing product, and working in it exhilarating.

Old foudre with tartrate build-up at Kuentz-Bas

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